The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)


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The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825

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Until the middle of the seventeenth century, Muscovy's rulers were more than content with such a strategy; indeed, it approached their ideal. It does not seem to have occurred to Aleksei Mikhailovich's predecessors that they could mobilise the population in search of strategic goals. That he began to think of doing so implies the emergence of unwelcome new pressures, both within and outside his own realm.

Hellie, tr. Modernisation theory and Russian history 9 Reformation Catholicism in Ukraine, incorporated at the treaty of Pereiaslavl' in Both national unity and royal spiritual authority were damaged to an extent that far outweighed any gain the state may have made by crippling the church as a potential focus of opposition. Neither was Muscovy's international position secure.

Eighteenth-Century Studies

Latent weaknesses were exposed when Aleksei Mikhailovich died in But there is still work to do in investigating that pattern's origins in the seventeenth century. Though perhaps not so incapacitated as historians once supposed, the tsar himself was scarcely the moving force behind changes which probably owed most to Prince V.

Yet the disturbances which followed Fedor's unexpected death on 27 April were enough to check the impulse for reform. Two main networks lined up behind the surviving sons of Aleksei Mikhailovich, rival candidates for the throne in the absence of a written law of succession. However, there was more to the ensuing chaos than this simple rivalry might imply. In the aftermath of the bloodshed, a compromise was reached. Shrewd as she was, Sophia was scarcely in a position to release Muscovy from its political paralysis. But she owed the comparative tranquillity of her regency never formally acknowledged not to some pre-considered programme of reform but to a tacit compact with boiars who expected no great change.

Twentieth Century History, Stalin and the modernisation of Russia

The limits to their tolerance were revealed when Sophia cam- paigned for recognition as ruler in her own right in the late s; to contemplate coronation was to overplay her hand. Sophia's reputation had been tarnished by Golitsyn's inglorious Crimean campaigns of and In September , having fought to the last for her political life, she herself succumbed to strel 'tsy pressure, spending her remaining years under arrest in Moscow's Novodevichii convent.

Though Tsar Ivan survived until 29 January , Muscovy was now in the hands of Aleksei Mikhailovich's fourteenth child, known to posterity as Peter the Great. Long fascinated by ships and soldiers, Peter, who had betrayed little interest in government in the early s, soon proved an active interventionist in affairs of state. Following the death of his mother, Natal'ia Naryshkina, in January , his domination was unquestioned. A giant of volcanic energy and a scourge of idleness, Peter maintained a lasting preference for impulsive personal supervision in matters both major and minor.

He oversaw the compilation of an Alphabetical Lexicon of New.


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More impor- tantly, the tsar made the decisive contribution to key legislation, notably the Maritime Regulation Morskoi ustav and the General Regulation General'nyi reglament , both promulgated in , and the Table of Ranks issued in Just as there was no question about Peter's capacity for work, so there was no doubting his thirst for novelty. Peter's work on maps of the Crimea helped to justify his election to the French Academy of Sciences in , though this honour evidently owed more to his royal status than to his limited scholarly achievements.

Had the tsar's fascination for all that was new amounted to no more than caprice, it might have reduced Russia to chaos. And this was only the most celebrated of Peter's rejections of Muscovite political culture. But many contemporaries were struck rather by its association with pagan Rome. Kedourie, Politics in the Middle East Oxford, , pp. Oresko, et al. Together they amounted to a rhetorical repudiation of almost everything he had inherited.

Small wonder that Peter was branded heretical by his opponents. Beneath the rhetoric, however, much that was redolent of the six- teenth century survived into the eighteenth, when the period of relative security granted by Peter's victory over the Swedes at Poltava in created the opportunity to translate piecemeal legislation into systematic reform. A crucial stage in the transition from personal to bureaucratic government was heralded in when the General Regulation set out detailed procedural rules for the colleges Peter had created to run central government in But these new institutions, like the court and the army, were to be staffed by nobles obliged to climb the Table of Ranks.

The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825

The adoption of a military ranking system for civilians showed how little the tsar's outlook had altered: the Military Regulation of , a harsh code of discipline also applied by the civil courts, represented a further application of military principles to the civilian sphere. All these measures bore the imprint of the tsar's techno- cratic mind; all were designed to create an autonomous state machine; and this in turn was to be a means to Peter's principal end, the mobilisation of Russia's human and natural resources in search of international prestige.

Historians have generally been divided between those who see im- pulsive personal dynamism as the key to Peter's reign, and those who place the germ of his rational planning no later than April , when a manifesto on the invitation of foreigners to Russia, drafted in German by the Livonian J.

Patkul, spoke broadly of the need for regulation to secure the common good. Paradoxically, both schools of thought are right. Behind the tsar's modernising rhetoric lay the suspicion that, left 28 The fundamental work remains S. Medushevskii, Utverzhdenie absoliutizma v Rossii: sravnitel 'noe istoricheskoe issledovanie Moscow, As a result, the dominant feature of Peter's legislation in the eyes of many contemporaries was not the strategic vision that undoubtedly underpinned it, but the ruthlessness required to implement it.

As in , the guards were motivated not so much by ideology as by resentment of their conditions of service.

The Modernisation of Russia – Pages 1 - 26 - Text Version | AnyFlip

But their lasting commitment to the Old Belief helped to identify the schism with resistance and subversion in the tsar's mind. He was barely more tolerant of those who supported change. Whilst the tsar's rationally ordered institutions famously provided the framework for Russian government until , the Muscovite culture of denunciation built into his system was to last even longer. A disappointment to his father, this sensitive boy became a magnet for Peter's critics.

Following a lengthy secret investigation, the tsarevich was publicly convicted of treason by a specially convened assembly of notables. He had certainly been tortured; few doubted that Peter had had him killed. On 11 February , the tsar decreed that the reigning monarch could nominate his own successor. Pososhkov, The Book of Poverty and Wealth, ed. Vlasto and L. Lewitter London, , p.

Lentin, Peter the Great. With the connivance of the guards, Peter's principal henchman, Prince A. Menshikov, engineered the succession of the tsar's widow.

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Born Marfa Skavronskaia, a semi-literate Livonian peasant who had caught Peter's roving eye in and married him in Aleksei's mother, Evdokiia, having been incarcerated in a convent on suspicion of involvement in the strel 'tsy revolt of , Catherine I reigned until her death in May But she was scarcely able to rule on her own account. Initially a cipher for Menshikov, she was persuaded in Feb- ruary to sanction a six-member Supreme Privy Council intended by his rivals to rein him in. Menshikov was still powerful enough to ensure that the dying Catherine nominated as her successor the eleven- year-old grandson of Peter the Great, who reigned as Peter II from until his death from smallpox in January However, the parvenu prince overreached himself by betrothing his daughter Mariia to the new boy tsar.

Stricken by illness, Menshikov was outmanoeuvred by another of Peter the Great's advisers, the Westphalian A. Heinrich Os- terman. Exiled in September , Menshikov died in Siberia in November Meanwhile the Dolgorukii and Golitsyn families came to dominate the Supreme Privy Council, which itself had eclipsed both the Senate and the colleges. Not only did these condi- tions bind the widowed Anna not to remarry and not to name an heir, but they also obliged her to consult a revamped eight-member council on all matters of high policy, including the declaration of war and peace.

Cohler, B. Miller, and H. Stone Cambridge, , p. Gathered in Moscow, where they had expected to witness Peter II's marriage to Princess Ekaterina Dolgorukaia rather than attend his funeral, these nobles proved a surprisingly cohesive political force. On 25 February Anna publicly tore up Goli- tsyn's conditions and embarked on her own unfettered reign. The potential for constitutional change is evident. The likelihood of another coup was increased when Anna designated as her heir the unborn child of her thirteen-year-old niece who not only had yet to conceive, but was not even engaged at the time.

Only in August did Anna Leopoldovna give birth to the son who became Ivan VI of Russia when the empress herself died childless in October of that year.

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Ivan was imprisoned until his assassination in If Russia came to seem less threatening to its European rivals under the rule of women and children than it had under Peter the Great, then spectacular domestic achievements were no more to be expected of such monarchs than were international triumphs. Small wonder that such an ambitious initiative as the Academy of Sciences, established in , got off to a slow start without its founder to goad its development.

The hostility to contemplative and thus allegedly useless monasticism expressed in Peter's Spiritual Regulation of was maintained under his immediate successors. Between and , the number of monks, nuns, and novices in Russia was almost halved from 25, to 14, By contrast, between and , the number of Russian linen and woollen manufactories grew from thirteen to seventy-nine and from fourteen to sixty-eight respectively.

Trade also held up well. For all that, what is most striking about the years after is what did not happen: there was no civil war. Following the unexpected death of Peter the Great, a ruler in the mould of Ivan the Terrible, Russia might have been expected to relapse into the sort of chaos that gripped Muscovy from Yet, pace Alexander Yanov, no Time of Troubles recurred.

Part of the explanation lies in his successors' need to enhance their legitimacy by emphasising 33 N. Moscow, , p.

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Il'in, et al. Modernisation theory and Russian history 17 continuity with Peter the Great. But this argument was persuasive only because it resonated with a wider acceptance of Peter's reforms. Para- doxically, this in turn depended on the incorporation within those reforms of many Muscovite traditions. The need to maintain Russia's new-found international status, enshrined in the treaty of Nystad in , was only the most obvious reason why the reformist impulse had to be sustained.

By contrast, the notoriously unattractive Anna was a crack shot at her best with a gun on her shoulder. Since neither empress sustained her initial interest in government, both looked negligent alongside their zealous contemporaries in the rival houses of Habsburg and Hohenzollern. In June , Anna delegated to her ministers the right to sign legislation; advisers and foreign envoys alike struggled to do business with Elizabeth, to whom routine was anathema.

The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)
The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History) The Modernisation of Russia, 1676-1825 (New Approaches to European History)

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